Blog Archives

People’s Intelligence Update

People’s Intelligence (PI), one of the winners of the Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention, is an expert system that automates the crowdsourcing, evaluation and verification of information in hard-to-access areas, provides actionable feedback to the source of the information and sends early warnings to partner organizations. PI addresses many of the shortcomings of current documentation initiatives using crowdsourcing: lack of relevant and quality information, no or limited assessment of the reliability

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Seed Grant Recipient Updates

In 2012, Humanity United and USAID launched the joint Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention, to identify new technologies and approaches to help us better predict, prevent and respond to the rise of mass atrocities. The Tech Challenge consisted of five sub-challenges, focusing on: i) identifying third-party enablers of atrocities, ii) capturing evidence of atrocities, iii) forecasting the potential for atrocities, iv) communicating with conflict-affected communities, and v) gathering information from

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The International Evidence Locker App Update

Atrocity evidence from conflict and post-conflict countries is often unavailable, of poor quality, unverifiable, or simply nonexistent. The International Evidence Locker (IEL) app is a free, downloadable phone application that enables a user to take a picture of an atrocity in progress, encrypt it, and send it instantaneously to a secure drop-box at a human rights organization for evidence storage.   Many exciting things have been happening in the Biotechnology

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Tents and Tukuls: Lessons from the Development of AMALGAM

The path of innovation is rarely, if ever, a straight line. Where you end up often bears little to no resemblance to where you initially thought your initial idea would take you. This is one of the many lessons we at the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology (Signal Program) at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) learned as a result of our participation in the Mass Atrocity Prevention Tech

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Ambassador Power Mentions Tech Challenge Winner, MediCapt, in Speech at Yale University

United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, recently delivered the Chubb Fellowship Lecture at Yale University’s Timothy Dwight College. In her remarks, she mentions MediCapt, a project of Physicians for Human Rights and winner of the Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention’s Capture challenge.   “We can improve accountability for violence against women and girls, through strengthening documentation of abuses and the capacity of justice officials to prosecute perpetrators. Physicians for

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People’s Intelligence: Early Achievements and Next Steps

The news is out, USAID awarded a seed grant to PI among other winners of the Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention co-sponsored by Humanity United.   A lot happened since we applied for this USAID seed grant earlier this year, including being awarded a first small grant by the Humanitarian Innovation Fund which allowed us to make some headway in presenting PI to a series of prospective human rights and

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Big News! Four Tech Challenge Winners Earn Follow-on Grants from USAID

We are thrilled to report that four winners of the joint Humanity United-USAID Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention have won follow-on grants from USAID, to allow them to pilot and scale their innovations.   The winners of the additional USAID funding are: International Evidence Locker, IVR Junction, Serval Project, and People’s Intelligence.   International Evidence Locker (IEL): IEL is a free, downloadable phone app that collects court-ready evidence while protecting witnesses. It

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Tech Challenge hosts a Google Hangout!

What are the key intersections of human rights and technology that hold the greatest promise?   On March 8th, 2013, the Tech Challenge hosted a Google Hangout with a few of our expert judges and winners from the first round of challenges to discuss some big questions about the future of human rights and technology. The panel spoke about what areas hold the greatest potential, as well as some of

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