TTC Blog

Genocide. Mass rape. Ethnic cleansing. These and other mass atrocities threaten our security and offend our conscience. Yet, we are now empowered by new technologies that can help prevent these crimes, and we believe it is our shared responsibility to act. The Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention, a partnership of USAID and Humanity United, awarded prizes in 2013 to 24 problem-solvers who developed innovative concepts and prototypes to help us better predict, prevent, and respond to the risk of mass atrocities. Now, many have taken their ideas to the next level. Follow their progress below, or explore the challenge categories and winners.

Latest News


  • People’s Intelligence: Early Achievements and Next Steps
    Posted on November 18, 2014
    by Christophe Billen, Founder, People's Intelligence
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    The news is out, USAID awarded a seed grant to PI among other winners of the Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention co-sponsored by Humanity United.   A lot happened since we applied for this USAID seed grant earlier this year, including being awarded a first small grant by the Humanitarian Innovation Fund which allowed us to make some headway in presenting PI to a series of prospective human rights and

  • IVR-Junction Big News! Four Tech Challenge Winners Earn Follow-on Grants from USAID
    Posted on November 4, 2014
    by The Tech Challenge
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    We are thrilled to report that four¬†winners of the joint Humanity United-USAID Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention have won follow-on grants from USAID, to allow them to pilot and scale their innovations.   The winners of the additional USAID funding are: International Evidence Locker, IVR Junction,¬†Serval Project, and People’s Intelligence.   International Evidence Locker (IEL): IEL is a free, downloadable phone app that collects court-ready evidence while protecting witnesses. It

  • tech challenge hands upraised Tech Challenge hosts a Google Hangout!
    Posted on March 9, 2013
    by The Tech Challenge
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    What are the key intersections of human rights and technology that hold the greatest promise?   On March 8th, 2013, the Tech Challenge hosted a Google Hangout with a few of our expert judges and winners from the first round of challenges to discuss some big questions about the future of human rights and technology. The panel spoke about what areas hold the greatest potential, as well as some of